Implementing ICS/ICAL to sync calendars with the event schedule in Open Event Webapp

As an end result, we want to provide a button to the user which will export the whole data of the event schedule to an ICS file and present it to the user for download after clicking the button. The whole work regarding the feature can be seen here.

Instead of implementing the whole specification ourselves which would be much tougher and time-consuming, we looked for some good open source libraries to do a bit of heavy lifting for us. After searching exhaustively for the solution, we came across this library which seemed appropriate for the job. The heart of the library is a function which takes in an object which contains information about the session. It expects information about the start and end time, subject, description and location of the session. Here is an excerpt from the function. The whole file can be seen here

var addEvent = function (session) {
 var calendarEvent = [
   'BEGIN:VEVENT',
   'UID:' + session.uid,
   'CLASS:PUBLIC',
   'DESCRIPTION:' + session.description,
   'DTSTART;VALUE=DATETIME:' + session.begin,
   'DTEND;VALUE=DATE:' + session.stop,
   'LOCATION:' + session.location,
   'SUMMARY;LANGUAGE=en-us:' + session.subject,
   'TRANSP:TRANSPARENT',
   'END:VEVENT'
 ];
 calendarEvents.push(calendarEvent);
};

We need to call the above function for every session in the event schedule. In the schedule template file, we have the jsonData object available which contain all the information about the event. It contains a field called timeList which contains the chronological order of the different sessions taking place throughout the events. The structure of that sub-object is something like this.

[{'slug': '2017-03-20', 'times': {'caption' : '09:00-09:30', 'sessions': [{'title': 'Welcome', 'description': 'Opening of the event', 'start': '09:00', 'end': '09:30'}]}]

So, we define a function for iterating through every session in the above object and adding it to the calendar. We can use most of the attributes directly but have to modify the date and time fields of the session to an appropriate format before adding it. The specification expects time in the ISO 8601 Format. You can read more about the specification here. For eg – If the date is 2017-03-20 and the time is 09:30 then it should be written as 20170320T093000. Here is some part of the function here

function exportICS() {
 var scheduleArr = {{{json timeList}}};
 // Helper functions for converting time to ISO 8601 Format
 function removeDashFromDate(date) {
   return date.replace(/-/g, '');
 }
 function removeColonFromTime(time) {
   return time.replace(/:/g, '');
 }
 // Iteration through the object and adding every session to the calendar
 scheduleArr.forEach(function(scheduleDay) {
   var date = removeDashFromDate(scheduleDay.slug);
   scheduleDay.times.forEach(function(time) {
     time.sessions.forEach(function(session) {
       var sessObj = {};
       sessObj.begin = date + 'T' + removeColonFromTime(session.start) + '00';
       sessObj.stop = date + 'T' + removeColonFromTime(session.end) + '00';
       sessObj.subject = session.title;
       sessObj.description = session.description;
       sessObj.location = session.location;
       cal.addEvent(sessObj);
     });
   });
 });
 cal.download('calendar', 'ics', false); // Download the ics file of the calendar
}

After defining the function, we add a button for starting the download of the whole schedule of the event. On clicking, we call the function which initiates the download after all the sessions of the event have been added.

<span class="schedule-download">
 <button type="button" class="btn btn-default export-schedule"><i class="fa fa-calendar" aria-hidden="true"></i></button>
</span>

$('.export-schedule').click(function() {
 exportICS();
});

Here is the export schedule button

65203af9-3962-4ab5-9655-3250bf2253a0.png

This is the download pop-up of the ICS file of the event.

Screenshot from 2017-08-10 21-56-16.png

After importing it in the Google calendar

Screenshot from 2017-08-10 23-01-22.png

References

Using Order Endpoints in Open Event API Server

The main feature i.e., Ordering API is added into API server. These endpoints provide the ability to work with the ordering system. This API is not simple like other as it checks for the discount codes and various other things as well.
The process in layman terms is very simple, first, a user must be registered or added as an attendee into Server without any order_id associated and then the attendee details will be sent to API server as a relationship.

Things needed to take care:

  1. Validating the discount code and ensure it is not exhausted
  2. Calculating the total amount on the server side by applying coupon
  3. Do not calculate amount if the user is the event admin
  4. Do not use coupon if user is event admin
  5. Handling payment modes and generating payment links
  6. Ensure that default status is always pending, unless the user is event admin

Creating Order

    • Prerequisite
      Before initiating the order, attendee records needs to be created associated with the event. These records will not have any order_id associated with them initially. The Order API will add the relationships.
    • Required Body
      Order API requires you to send event relationship and attendee records to create order_tickets
    • Permissions
      Only organizers can provide custom amount and status. Others users will get their status as pending and amount will be recalculated in server. The response will reflect the calculated amount and updated status.
      Also to initiate any order, user must be logged in. Guest can not create any order
    • Payment Modes
      There are three payment modes, free, stripe and paypal. If payment_mode is not provided then API will consider it as “free”.
    • Discount Codes
      Discount code can be sent as a relationship to the API. The Server will validate the code and will act accordingly.

Validating Discount Codes

Discount codes are checked to ensure they are valid, first check ensures that the user is not co-organizer

# Apply discount only if the user is not event admin
if data.get('discount') and not has_access('is_coorganizer', event_id=data['event']):

Second, check ensures that the discount code is active

if not discount_code.is_active:
  raise UnprocessableEntity({'source': 'discount_code_id'}, "Inactive Discount Code")

The third, Check ensures its validity is not expired

if not (valid_from <= now <= valid_till):
  raise UnprocessableEntity({'source': 'discount_code_id'}, "Inactive Discount Code")

Fourth Check ensure that the quantity is not exhausted

if not TicketingManager.match_discount_quantity(discount_code, data['ticket_holders']):
  raise UnprocessableEntity({'source': 'discount_code_id'}, 'Discount Usage Exceeded')

Lastly, the fifth check ensures that event id matches with given discount associated event

if discount_code.event.id != data['event'] and discount_code.user_for == TICKET:
  raise UnprocessableEntity({'source': 'discount_code_id'}, "Invalid Discount Code")

Calculating Order Amount

The next important thing is to recalculate the order amount and it will calculated only if user is not the event admin

if not has_access('is_coorganizer', **view_kwargs):
  TicketingManager.calculate_update_amount(order)

API Response

The API response apart from general fields will provide you the payment-url depending upon the payment mode you selected.

  • Stripe : will give payment-url as stripe
  • Paypal: will provide the payment completing url in payment-url

This all explains the flow and requirements to create an order. Order API consists of many more things related with TIcketing Manager which works to create the payment url and apply discount count as well as calculate the total order amount.

Resources

  1. Stripe Payments API Docs
    https://stripe.com/docs/api
  2. Paypal Payments API docs
    https://developer.paypal.com/docs/api/
  3. Paypal Sandbox docs
    https://developer.paypal.com/docs/classic/lifecycle/ug_sandbox/

 

Adding Sticky Headers for Grouping Sponsors List in Open Event Android App

The Open Event Android project has a fragment for showing sponsors of the event. Each Sponsor model has a name, url, type and level. The SponsorsFragment shows list according to type and level. Each sponsor list item has sponsor type TextView. There can be more than one sponsors with the same type. So instead of showing type in the Sponsor item we can add Sticky header showing type at the top which will group the sponsors with the same type and also gives the great UI. In this post I explain how to add the Sticky headers in the RecyclerView using StickyHeadersRecyclerView library.

1. Add dependency

In order to use Sticky Headers in your app add following dependencies in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
	compile 'com.timehop.stickyheadersrecyclerview:library:0.4.3'
}

2. Create layout for header

Create recycler_view_header.xml file for the header. It will contain LinearLayout and simple TextView which will show Sponsor type.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:orientation="vertical">

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/recyclerview_view_header"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:padding="@dimen/padding_medium" />

</LinearLayout>

Here you can modify layout according to your need.

3.  Implement StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter

Now implement StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter in the List Adapter. Override getHeaderId(), onCreateHeaderViewHolder(), onBindHeaderViewHolder
() methods of the StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter.

public class SponsorsListAdapter extends BaseRVAdapter<Sponsor, SponsorViewHolder> implements StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter {
    ...

    @Override
    public long getHeaderId(int position) {...}

    @Override
    public RecyclerView.ViewHolder onCreateHeaderViewHolder(ViewGroup parent) {...}

    @Override
    public void onBindHeaderViewHolder(RecyclerView.ViewHolder holder, int position) {...}
}

 

The getHeaderId() method is used to give an id to the header. It is the main part of the implementation here all the sponsors with the same type should return the same id. In our case we are returning sponsor level because all the sponsor types have corresponding levels.

String level = getItem(position).getLevel();
return Long.valueOf(level);

 

The onCreateHeaderViewHolder() returns Recycler ViewHolder for the header. Here we will use in the inflate() method of  LayoutInflater to get View object of recycler_view_header.xml file. Then return new RecyclerView.ViewHolder object using View object.

View view = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext())
                .inflate(R.layout.recycler_view_header, parent, false);
return new RecyclerView.ViewHolder(view) {};

 

The onBindHeaderViewHolder() binds the sponsor to HeaderViewHolder. In this method we sets the sponsor type string to the TextView we have created in the recycler_view_header.xml file.

TextView textView = (TextView) holder.itemView.findViewById(R.id.recyclerview_view_header);
textView.setGravity(Gravity.CENTER_HORIZONTAL);

String sponsorType = getItem(position).getType();
if (!Utils.isEmpty(sponsorType))  
   textView.setText(sponsorType.toUpperCase());

Here you can also modify TextView according to your need. We are centering text using setGravity() method.

4.  Setup RecyclerView

Now create RecyclerView and set adapter using setAdapter() method. Also as we want the linear list of sponsors so set the LinearLayoutManager using setLayoutManager() method.

SponsorsListAdapter sponsorsListAdapter = new SponsorsListAdapter(getContext(), sponsors);
sponsorsRecyclerView.setAdapter(sponsorsListAdapter);
sponsorsRecyclerView.setLayoutManager(new LinearLayoutManager(getActivity()));

 

Create StickyRecyclerHeadersDecoration object and add it in the RecyclerView using addItemDecoration() method.

final StickyRecyclerHeadersDecoration headersDecoration = new StickyRecyclerHeadersDecoration(sponsorsListAdapter);

sponsorsRecyclerView.addItemDecoration(headersDecoration);
sponsorsListAdapter.registerAdapterDataObserver(new RecyclerView.AdapterDataObserver(){
    @Override
    public void onChanged {
            headersDecoration.invalidateHeaders();
    }
});

Now add AdapterDataObserver using registerAdapterDataObserver() method. The onChanged() method in this observer is called whenever dataset changes. So in this method invalidate headers using invalidateHeaders() method of HeaderDecoration.

Now we are all set. Run the app it will look like this.

Conclusion

Sticky headers in the App gives great UI and UX. You can also add a click listener to the headers. To know more about Sticky Headers follow the links given below.

Customising URL Using Custom Adapters in Open Event Front-end

Open-Event Front-end uses Ember data for handling Open Event Orga API which abides by JSON API specs. The API has relationships which represent models in the database, however there are some API endpoints for which the URL is not direct. We make use of custom adapter to build a custom URL for the requests.
In this blog we will see how to Implement relationships which do not have a model in the API server. Lets see how we implemented the admin-statistics-event API using custom adapter?

Creating Order-statistics model
To create a new model we use ember-cli command:

ember g model admin-statistics-event

The generated model:

export default ModelBase.extend({
  draft     : attr('number'),
  published : attr('number'),
  past      : attr('number')
})

The API returns 3 attributes namely draft, published & past which represent the total number of drafted, live and past event in the system. The admin-statistics-event is an admin related model.
Creating custom adapter
To create a new adapter we use ember-cli command:

ember g adapter event-statistics-event

If we try to do a GET request the URL for the request will be ‘v1/admin-statistics-event’ which is an incorrect endpoint. We create a custom adapter to override the buildURL method.

buildURL(modelName, id, snapshot, requestType, query) {
  let url = this._super(modelName, id, snapshot, requestType, query);
  url = url.replace('admin-statistics-event', 'admin/statistics/event');
  return url;
}

We create a new variable url which holds the url generated by the buildURL method of the super adapter. We call the super method using ‘this._super’. We will now replace the ‘admin-statistics-event’ with ‘admin/statistics/event’ in url variable. We return the new url variable. This results in generation of correct URL for the request.
Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.
Resources

Create Event by Importing JSON files in Open Event Server

Apart from the usual way of creating an event in  FOSSASIA’s Orga Server project by using POST requests in Events API, another way of creating events is importing a zip file which is an archive of multiple JSON files. This way you can create a large event like FOSSASIA with lots of data related to sessions, speakers, microlocations, sponsors just by uploading JSON files to the system. Sample JSON file can be found in the open-event project of FOSSASIA. The basic workflow of importing an event and how it works is as follows:

  • First step is similar to uploading files to the server. We need to send a POST request with a multipart form data with the zipped archive containing the JSON files.
  • The POST request starts a celery task to start importing data from JSON files and storing them in the database.
  • The celery task URL is returned as a response to the POST request. You can use this celery task for polling purposes to get the status. If the status is FAILURE, we get the error text along with it. If status is SUCCESS we get the resulting event data
  • In the celery task, each JSON file is read separately and the data is stored in the db with the proper relations.
  • Sending a GET request to the above mentioned celery task, after the task has been completed returns the event id along with the event URL.

Let’s see how each of these points work in the background.

Uploading ZIP containing JSON Files

For uploading a zip archive instead of sending a JSON data in the POST request we send a multipart form data. The multipart/form-data format of sending data allows an entire file to be sent as a data in the POST request along with the relevant file informations. One can know about various form content types here .

An example cURL request looks something like this:

curl -H "Authorization: JWT <access token>" -X POST -F '[email protected]' http://localhost:5000/v1/events/import/json

The above cURL request uploads a file event1.zip from your current directory with the key as ‘file’ to the endpoint /v1/events/import/json. The user uploading the feels needs to have a JWT authentication key or in other words be logged in to the system as it is necessary to create an event.

@import_routes.route('/events/import/<string:source_type>', methods=['POST'])
@jwt_required()
def import_event(source_type):
    if source_type == 'json':
        file_path = get_file_from_request(['zip'])
    else:
        file_path = None
        abort(404)
    from helpers.tasks import import_event_task
    task = import_event_task.delay(email=current_identity.email, file=file_path,
                                   source_type=source_type, creator_id=current_identity.id)
    # create import job
    create_import_job(task.id)

    # if testing
    if current_app.config.get('CELERY_ALWAYS_EAGER'):
        TASK_RESULTS[task.id] = {
            'result': task.get(),
            'state': task.state
        }
    return jsonify(
        task_url=url_for('tasks.celery_task', task_id=task.id)
    )


After the request is received we check if a file exists in the key ‘file’ of the form-data. If it is there, we save the file and get the path to the saved file. Then we send this path over to the celery task and run the task with the
.delay() function of celery. After the celery task is started, the corresponding data about the import job is stored in the database for future debugging and logging purposes. After this we return the task url for the celery task that we started.

Celery Task to Import Data

Just like exporting of event, importing is also a time consuming task and we don’t want other application requests to be paused because of this task. Hence, we use a celery queue to execute this task. Whenever an import task is started, it is added to the celery queue. When it comes to the front of the queue it is executed.

For importing, we have created a celery task, import.event which calls the import_event_task_base() function that uses the import helper functions to get the data from JSON files imported and saved in the DB. After the task is completed, we update the import job data in the table with the status as either SUCCESS or FAILURE depending on the outcome of the celery task.

As a result of the celery task, the newly created event’s id and the frontend link from where we can visit the url is returned. This along with the status of the celery task is returned as the response for a GET request on the celery task. If the celery task fails, then the state is changed to FAILURE and the error which the celery faced is returned as the error message in the result key. We also print an error traceback in the celery worker.

@celery.task(base=RequestContextTask, name='import.event', bind=True, throws=(BaseError,))
def import_event_task(self, file, source_type, creator_id):
    """Import Event Task"""
    task_id = self.request.id.__str__()  # str(async result)
    try:
        result = import_event_task_base(self, file, source_type, creator_id)
        update_import_job(task_id, result['id'], 'SUCCESS')
        # return item
    except BaseError as e:
        print(traceback.format_exc())
        update_import_job(task_id, e.message, e.status if hasattr(e, 'status') else 'failure')
        result = {'__error': True, 'result': e.to_dict()}
    except Exception as e:
        print(traceback.format_exc())
        update_import_job(task_id, e.message, e.status if hasattr(e, 'status') else 'failure')
        result = {'__error': True, 'result': ServerError().to_dict()}
    # send email
    send_import_mail(task_id, result)
    # return result
    return result

 

Save Data from JSON

In import helpers, we have the functions which perform the main task of reading the JSON files, creating sqlalchemy model objects from them and saving them in the database. There are few global dictionaries which help maintain the order in which the files are to be imported and saved and also the file vs model mapping. The first JSON file to be imported is the event JSON file. Since all the other tables to be imported are related to the event table so first we read the event JSON file. After that the order in which the files are read is as follows:

  1. SocialLink
  2. CustomForms
  3. Microlocation
  4. Sponsor
  5. Speaker
  6. Track
  7. SessionType
  8. Session

This order helps maintain the foreign constraints. For importing data from these files we use the function create_service_from_json(). It sorts the elements in the data list  based on the key “id”. It then loops over all the elements or dictionaries contained in the data list. In each iteration delete the unnecessary key-value pairs from the dictionary. Then set the event_id for that element to the id of the newly created event from import instead of the old id present in the data.  After all this is done, create a model object based on the mapping with the filename with the dict data. Then save that model data into the database.

def create_service_from_json(task_handle, data, srv, event_id, service_ids=None):
    """
    Given :data as json, create the service on server
    :service_ids are the mapping of ids of already created services.
        Used for mapping old ids to new
    """
    if service_ids is None:
        service_ids = {}
    global CUR_ID
    # sort by id
    data.sort(key=lambda k: k['id'])
    ids = {}
    ct = 0
    total = len(data)
    # start creating
    for obj in data:
        # update status
        ct += 1
        update_state(task_handle, 'Importing %s (%d/%d)' % (srv[0], ct, total))
        # trim id field
        old_id, obj = _trim_id(obj)
        CUR_ID = old_id
        # delete not needed fields
        obj = _delete_fields(srv, obj)
        # related
        obj = _fix_related_fields(srv, obj, service_ids)
        obj['event_id'] = event_id
        # create object
        new_obj = srv[1](**obj)
        db.session.add(new_obj)
        db.session.commit()
        ids[old_id] = new_obj.id
        # add uploads to queue
        _upload_media_queue(srv, new_obj)

    return ids


After the data has been saved, the next thing to do is upload all the media files to the server. This we do using the
_upload_media_queue()  function. It takes paths to upload the files to from the storage.py helper file for APIs. Then it uploads the files using the various helper functions to the static data storage services like AWS S3, Google storage, etc.

Other than this, the import helpers also contains the function to create an import job that keeps a record of all the imports along with the task url and the user id of the user who started the importing task. It also stores the status of the task. Then there is the get_file_from_request()  function which saves the file that is uploaded through the POST request and returns the path to that file.

Get Response about Event Imported

The POST request returns a task url of the form /v1/tasks/ebe07632-392b-4ae9-8501-87ac27258ce5. To get the final result, you need to keep polling this URL. To know more about polling read my previous blog about exporting event or visit this link. So when the task is completed you would get a “result” key along with the status. The state can either be SUCCESS or FAILURE. If it is a FAILURE you will get a corresponding error message due to which the celery task failed. If it is a success then you get data related to the corresponding event that was created because of import. The data returned are the event id, event name and the event url which you can use to visit the event from the frontend. This data is also sent to the user as an email and notification.

An example response looks something like this:

{ 
    “result”: {
“event_name” : “FOSSASIA 2016”,
     “id” : “24”,
     “url” : “https://eventyay.com/events/ab3de6
},
    “state” : “SUCCESS”
}

The corresponding event name and the url is also sent to the user who started the import task. From the frontend, one can use the object value of the result to show the name of the event that is imported along with providing the event url. Since the id and identifier are both present in the result returned one can also make use of them to send GET, PATCH and other API requests to the events/ endpoint and get the corresponding relationship urls from it to query the other APIs. Thus, the entire data that is imported gets available to the frontend as well.

 

Reference Links:

 

Image Loading in Open Event Organizer Android App using Glide

Open Event Organizer is an Android App for the Event Organizers and Entry Managers. Open Event API Server acts as a backend for this App. The core feature of the App is to scan a QR code from the ticket to validate an attendee’s check in. Other features of the App are to display an overview of sales and ticket management. As per the functionality, the performance of the App is very important. The App should be functional even on a weak network. Talking about the performance, the image loading part in the app should be handled efficiently as it is not an essential part of the functionality of the App. Open Event Organizer uses Glide, a fast and efficient image loading library created by Sam Judd. I will be talking about its implementation in the App in this blog.

First part is the configuration of the glide in the App. The library provides a very easy way to do that. Your app needs to implement a class named AppGlideModule using annotations provided by the library and it generates a glide API which can be used in the app for all the image loading stuff. The AppGlideModule implementation in the Orga App looks like:

@GlideModule
public final class GlideAPI extends AppGlideModule {

   @Override
   public void registerComponents(Context context, Glide glide, Registry registry) {
       registry.replace(GlideUrl.class, InputStream.class, new OkHttpUrlLoader.Factory());
   }

   // TODO: Modify the options here according to the need
   @Override
   public void applyOptions(Context context, GlideBuilder builder) {
       int diskCacheSizeBytes = 1024 * 1024 * 10; // 10mb
       builder.setDiskCache(new InternalCacheDiskCacheFactory(context, diskCacheSizeBytes));
   }

   @Override
   public boolean isManifestParsingEnabled() {
       return false;
   }
}

 

This generates the API named GlideApp by default in the same package which can be used in the whole app. Just make sure to add the annotation @GlideModule to this implementation which is used to find this class in the app. The second part is using the generated API GlideApp in the app to load images using URLs. Orga App uses data binding for layouts. So all the image loading related code is placed at a single place in DataBinding class which is used by the layouts. The class has a method named setGlideImage which takes an image view, an image URL, a placeholder drawable and a transformation. The relevant code is:

private static void setGlideImage(ImageView imageView, String url, Drawable drawable, Transformation<Bitmap> transformation) {
       if (TextUtils.isEmpty(url)) {
           if (drawable != null)
               imageView.setImageDrawable(drawable);
           return;
       }
       GlideRequest<Drawable> request = GlideApp
           .with(imageView.getContext())
           .load(Uri.parse(url));

       if (drawable != null) {
           request
               .placeholder(drawable)
               .error(drawable);
       }
       request
           .centerCrop()
           .transition(withCrossFade())
           .transform(transformation == null ? new CenterCrop() : transformation)
           .into(imageView);
   }

 

The method is very clear. First, the URL is checked for nullability. If null, the drawable is set to the imageview and method returns. Usage of GlideApp is simpler. Pass the URL to the GlideApp using the method with which returns a GlideRequest which has operators to set other required options like transitions, transformations, placeholder etc. Lastly, pass the imageview using into operator. By default, Glide uses HttpURLConnection provided by android to load the image which can be changed to use Okhttp using the extension provided by the library. This is set in the AppGlideModule implementation in the registerComponents method.

Links:
1. Documentation for Glide, an Image Loading Library
2. Documentation for Okhttp, an HTTP client for Android and Java Applications

Adding Static Code Analyzers in Open Event Orga Android App

This week, in Open Event Orga App project (Github Repo), we wanted to add some static code analysers that run on each build to ensure that the app code is free of potential bugs and follows a certain style. Codacy handles a few of these things, but it is quirky and sometimes produces false positives. Furthermore, it is not a required check for builds so errors can creep in gradually. We chose checkstyle, PMD and Findbugs for static analysis as they are most popular for Java. The area they work on kind of overlaps but gives security regarding code quality. Findbugs actually analyses the bytecode instead of source code to find possible JVM bugs.

Adding dependencies

The first step was to add the required dependencies. We chose the library android-check as it contained all 3 libraries and was focused on Android and easily configurable. First, we add classpath in project level build.gradle

dependencies {
   classpath 'com.noveogroup.android:check:1.2.4'
}

 

Then, we apply the plugin in app level build.gradle

apply plugin: 'com.noveogroup.android.check'

 

This much is enough to get you started, but by default, the build will not fail if any violations are found. To change this behaviour, we add this block in app level build.gradle

check {
   abortOnError true
}

 

There are many configuration options available for the library. Do check out the project github repo using the link provided above

Configuration

The default configuration is of easy level, and will be enough for most projects, but it is of course configurable. So we took the default hard configs for 3 analysers and disabled properties which we did not need. The place you need to store the config files is the config folder in either root project directory or the app directory. The name of the config file should be checkstyle.xml, pmd.xml and findbugs.xml

These are the default settings and you can obviously configure them by following the instructions on the project repo

Checkstyle

For checkstyle, you can find the easy and hard configuration here

The basic principle is that if you need to add a check, you include a module like this:

<module name="NewlineAtEndOfFile" />

 

If you want to modify the default value of some property, you do it like this:

<module name="RegexpSingleline">
   <property name="format" value="\s+$" />
   <property name="minimum" value="0" />
   <property name="maximum" value="0" />
   <property name="message" value="Line has trailing spaces." />
   <property name="severity" value="info" />
</module>

 

And if you want to remove a check, you can ignore it like this:

<module name="EqualsHashCode">
   <property name="severity" value="ignore" />
</module>

 

It’s pretty straightforward and easy to configure.

Findbugs

For findbugs, you can find the easy and hard configuration here

Findbugs configuration exists in the form of filters where we list resources it should skip analyzing, like:

<Match>
   <Class name="~.*\.BuildConfig" />
</Match>

 

If we want to ignore a particular pattern, we can do so like this:

<!-- No need to force hashCode for simple models -->
<Match>
   <Bug pattern="HE_EQUALS_USE_HASHCODE " />
</Match>

 

Sometimes, you’d want to only ignore a pattern only for certain files or fields. Findbugs supports regex to match such items:

<!-- Don't complain about rules in tests. -->
<Match>
   <Field name="~.*mockitoRule"/>
   <Bug pattern="URF_UNREAD_PUBLIC_OR_PROTECTED_FIELD" />
</Match>

 

You can also annotate your code to suppress warning in the particular class, mehod or field rather than disabling it for the whole project. For that, you need to add findbugs annotations dependency in the project

compile 'com.google.code.findbugs:findbugs-annotations:3.0.1'

 

And then use it like this:

@SuppressFBWarnings(
   value = "ICAST_IDIV_CAST_TO_DOUBLE",
   justification = "We want granularity to be integer")
public void showChart(LineChart lineChart) {
   ...
}

 

It also allows setting the justification of suppressing the rule for clarity

PMD

For findbugs, you can find the easy and hard configuration here

Like checkstyle, you have to first add a rule set to tell PMD which checks to perform:

<rule ref="rulesets/java/android.xml" />

 

If you want to modify the default value of the rule, you can do it like this:

<rule ref="rulesets/java/codesize.xml/TooManyMethods">
   <properties>
       <property name="maxmethods" value="15" />
   </properties>
</rule>

 

Or if you want to entirely exclude a rule, you can do it like this:

<rule ref="rulesets/java/basic.xml">
   <exclude name="OverrideBothEqualsAndHashcode" />
</rule>

 

PMD also supports suppressing warnings in the code itself using annotations. You don’t require any external libraries for it as it supports the in built java.lang.SuppessWarnings annotations. You can use it like this:

@SuppressWarnings("PMD.AvoidInstantiatingObjectsInLoops") // Entries cannot be created outside loop
private LineDataSet setData(Map<String, Long> map, String label) throws ParseException {
   ...
}

 

As you can see, we need to prepend “PMD.” to the rule name so that there are no clashes while annotation processing. Remember to comment the reason for suppressing the warning so that your co-developers know and can remove it in future if criteria does not meet anymore.

There is a lot more to learn about these static analyzers, which you can read upon in their official documentation:

Implementing Admin Statistics Mail and Session API on Open Event Frontend

This blog article will illustrate how the admin-statistics-mail and admin-statistics-session API  are implemented on the admin dashboard page in Open Event Frontend.Our discussion primarily will involve the admin/index route to illustrate the process.The primary end points of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for fetching the admin statistics  for the dashboard are

GET /v1/admin/statistics/mails
GET /v1/admin/statistics/sessions

First we need to create the corresponding models according to the type of the response returned by the server , which in this case will be admin-statistics-event and admin-statistics-sessions, so we proceed with the ember CLI commands:

ember g model admin-statistics-mail
ember g model admin-statistics-session

Next we define the model according to the requirements. The model needs to extend the base model class, and all the fields will be number since the all the data obtained via these models from the API will be numerical statistics

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';

export default ModelBase.extend({
 oneDay     : attr('number'),
 threeDays  : attr('number'),
 sevenDays  : attr('number'),
 thirtyDays : attr('number')
});

And the model for sessions will be the following. It too will consist all the attributes of type number since it represents statistics

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';

export default ModelBase.extend({
 confirmed : attr('number'),
 accepted  : attr('number'),
 submitted : attr('number'),
 draft     : attr('number'),
 rejected  : attr('number'),
 pending   : attr('number')
});

Now we need to load the data from the api using the models, so will send a get request to the api to fetch the current permissions. This can be easily achieved via a store query in the model hook of the admin/index route.However this cannot be a normal get request. Because the the urls for the end point are /v1/admin/statistics/mails & /v1/admin/statistics/sessions but there are no relationships between statistics and various sub routes, which is what ember’s default behaviour would expect.

Hence we need to override the generated default request url using custom adapters and use buildUrl method to customize the request urls.

import ApplicationAdapter from './application';

export default ApplicationAdapter.extend({
 buildURL(modelName, id, snapshot, requestType, query) {
   let url = this._super(modelName, id, snapshot, requestType, query);
   url = url.replace('admin-statistics-session', 'admin/statistics/session');
   return url;
 }
});

The buildURL method replaces the the default  URL for admin-statistics-session  with admin/statistics/session otherwise the the default request would have been

GET v1/admin-statistics-session

Similarly it must be done for the mail statistics too. These will ensure that the correct request is sent to the server. Now all that remains is making the requests in the model hooks and adjusting the template slightly for the new model.

model() {
   return RSVP.hash({
         mails: this.get('store').queryRecord('admin-statistics-mail', {
       filter: {
         name : 'id',
         op   : 'eq',
         val  : 1
       }
     }),
     sessions: this.get('store').queryRecord('admin-statistics-session', {
       filter: {
         name : 'id',
         op   : 'eq',
         val  : 1
       }
     })
   });
 }


queryRecord is used instead of query because only a single record is expected to be returned by the API.

Resources

Tags :

Open event, Open event frontend, ember JS, ember service, semantic UI, ember-data, ember adapters,  tickets, Open Event API, Ember models

Adding TextDrawable as a PlaceHolder in Open Event Android App

The Open Event Android project has a fragment for showing speakers of the event. Each Speaker model has image-url which is used to fetch the image from server and load in the ImageView. In some cases it is possible that image-url is null or client is not able to fetch the image from the server because of the network problem. So in these cases showing Drawable which contains First letters of the first name and the last name along with a color background gives great UI and UX. In this post I explain how to add TextDrawable as a placeholder in the ImageView using TextDrawable library.

1. Add dependency

In order to use TextDrawable in your app add following dependencies in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
	compile 'com.amulyakhare:com.amulyakhare.textdrawable:1.0.1'
}

2. Create static TextDrawable builder

Create static method in the Application class which returns the builder object for creating TextDrawables. We are creating static method so that the method can be used all over the App.

private static TextDrawable.IShapeBuilder textDrawableBuilder;

public static TextDrawable.IShapeBuilder getTextDrawableBuilder()
 {
        if (textDrawableBuilder == null) {
            textDrawableBuilder = TextDrawable.builder();
        }
        return textDrawableBuilder;
}

This method first checks if the builder object is null or not and then initialize it if null. Then it returns the builder object.

3.  Create and initialize TextDrawable object

Now create a TextDrawable object and initialize it using the builder object. The Builder has methods like buildRound(), buildRect() and buildRoundRect() for making drawable round, rectangle and rectangle with rounded corner respectively. Here we are using buildRect() to make the drawable rectangle.

TextDrawable drawable = OpenEventApp.getTextDrawableBuilder()
                    .buildRect(Utils.getNameLetters(name), ColorGenerator.MATERIAL.getColor(name));

The buildRect() method takes two arguments one is String text which will be used as a text in the drawable and second is int color which will be used as a background color of the drawable. Here ColorGenerator.MATERIAL returns material color for given string.

4.  Create getNameLetters()  method

The getNameLetters(String name) method should return the first letters of the first name and last name as String.

Example, if the name is “Shailesh Baldaniya” then it will return “SB”.

public static String getNameLetters(String name) {
        if (isEmpty(name))
            return "#";

        String[] strings = name.split(" ");
        StringBuilder nameLetters = new StringBuilder();
        for (String s : strings) {
            if (nameLetters.length() >= 2)
                return nameLetters.toString().toUpperCase();
            if (!isEmpty(s)) {
                nameLetters.append(s.trim().charAt(0));
            }
        }
        return nameLetters.toString().toUpperCase();
}

Here we are using split method to get the first name and last name from the name. The charAt(0) gives the first character of the string. If the name string is null then it will return “#”.   

5.  Use Drawable

Now after creating the TextDrawable object we need to load it as a placeholder in the ImageView for this we are using Picasso library.

Picasso.with(context)
        .load(image-url)
        .placeholder(drawable)
        .error(drawable)
        .into(speakerImage);

Here the placeholder() method displays drawable while the image is being loaded. The error() method displays drawable when the requested image could not be loaded when the device is offline. SpeakerImage is an ImageView in which we want to load the image.

Conclusion

TextDrawable is a great library for generating Drawable with text. It has also support for animations, font and shapes. To know more about TextDrawable follow the links given below.

Implementing Logging Functionality in Open Event Webapp

  • INFO: Info statements give information about the task currently being performed by the webapp
  • SUCCESS: Success statements give the information of a task being successfully completed
  • ERROR: Error statements give information about a task failing to complete. These statements also contain a detailed error log

Along with the type of the statement, the object also contains information about the task. For all types of statements, there is a field called smallMessage containing short information about the task. For the ERROR statements where more information is required to see what went wrong, the message object has an additional field called largeMessage which holds detailed information about the event.

We also create a new file called buildlogger.js and define a function for creating log statements about the tasks being performed by generator and export it. The function creates a message object from the arguments received and then return it to the client under the buildLog event via the socket IO.

exports.addLog = function(type, smallMessage, socket, largeMessage) {
 var obj = {'type' : type, 'smallMessage' : smallMessage, 'largeMessage': largeMessage};
 var emit = false;
 if (socket.constructor.name === 'Socket') {
   emit = true;
 }
 if (emit) {
   socket.emit('buildLog', obj);
 }
};

Most of the steps of the generation process are defined in the generator.js file. So, we include the logging file there and call the addLog function for sending logs messages to the client. All the different steps like cleaning temporary folders, copying assets, fetching JSONs, creating the website directory, resizing images etc have multiple log statements for their inception and successful/erroneous completion. Below is an excerpt from the cleaning step.

var logger = require('./buildlogger.js');
 async.series([
   (done) => {
     console.log('CLEANING TEMPORARY FOLDERS\n');
     logger.addLog('Info', 'Cleaning up the previously existing temporary folders', socket);
     fs.remove(distHelper.distPath + '/' + appFolder, (err) => {
       if(err !== null) {
         // Sending Error Message when the remove process failed
         logger.addLog('Error', 'Failed to clean up the previously existing temporary folders', socket, err);
       }
       // Success message denoting the completion of the step
       logger.addLog('Success', 'Successfully cleaned up the temporary folders', socket);
       done(null, 'clean');
     });
   }
 )]

But we have only done the server side work now. We also have to handle the message on the client side. We send the message object to the client under the event buildLog and set up a listener for that event to catch the sent message. After the message object is received on the client side, we extract the information out of that object and then display it on the website. We have a div having an id of buildLog for displaying the log information. The content of the message is dynamically added to it as soon as it is received from the server. All the client side logic is handled in the form.js file.

socket.on('buildLog', function(data) {
   var spanElem = $('<span></span>'); // will contain the info about type of statement
   var spanMess = $('<span></span>'); // will contain the actual message
   var aElem = $('<button></button>'); // Button to view the detailed error log
   var paragraph = $('<p></p>'); // Contain the whole statement
   var divElem; // Contain the detailed error log
   spanMess.text(data.smallMessage);
   spanElem.text(data.type.toUpperCase() + ':');
   paragraph.append(spanElem);
   paragraph.append(spanMess);
   divElem.text(data.largeMessage);
   paragraph.append(aElem);
   paragraph.append(divElem);
   $('#buildLog').append(paragraph); // Div containing all the log messages
};

This is how the logs look on the client side. They are loaded on the go in real time as and when the events occur.

image (1).jpg

Resources: